Wan Wai Meng

19 June 2009 - 4:00pm Comments Off

After everything that has happened, Rinpoche not giving up on me has had the biggest impact on me. They say the Lama is the assassin of one’s ego and I could not agree more.

Wan Wai Meng, 36
e-Division, Tsem Ladrang
Study Group Moderator, Kechara Education

Since his childhood, when he developed a fervent wish to be a Buddhist, Wan Wai Meng has had a long spiritual journey. Always active in Dharma, Wai Meng was formerly involved with the Tzu Chi Foundation as a volunteer. He first met H.E. Tsem Rinpoche in 1992 but then lost touch until he bumped into Rinpoche again many years later at a restaurant. Since reconnecting, Wai Meng has become heavily involved in Kechara as a study group moderator for Kechara Education and as an e-Division volunteer.


Did you have any spiritual experiences or spiritual inclinations before Kechara?

Yes, I did. I saw my first Buddha when I was in primary school and was so intrigued by it that I became determined to be a Buddhist and nothing else! My best friend then was also a Buddhist and since I looked up to him, I figured if we were both Buddhist, we must both be on the right path. However, after many years, I still didn’t know what Buddhism was about – I only knew it had something to do with ‘karma’.


Before coming to Kechara, what kind of questions were you asking about your life or about life in general?

I wanted to know why I was suffering and how I could put an end to it. I became acquainted with Tzu Chi’s activities as a teenager and I was moved because their activities reach out to the poor. However, although I developed sympathy for the people we helped, I still had no idea how to benefit them or why they were in that situation.


So when did you start Dharma? When did you join Dharma work?

One day, quite some time after I’d first met H.E. Tsem Rinpoche, Rinpoche’s assistant told me she was going to start a business to aid Rinpoche’s financial situation. At the time, I already had a good salary but was greedy so I agreed to help her run a cybercafé. However, the venture failed because I was not very knowledgeable about the business, did not listen to advice and refused to ask for help. I thought I was doing Dharma and Rinpoche a favour – I did not know it was actually the other way around! After the business failed, I was advised by our Dharma Protector to read the Lamrim. Only then did I begin to reflect on cause and effect, which made a lot more sense than blaming situations and people.


Now that that’s all over and you are a moderator for the Lamrim class, can you tell us which one of Rinpoche’s teachings has had the most impact on you?

After everything that has happened, Rinpoche not giving up on me has had the biggest impact on me. They say the Lama is the assassin of one’s ego and I could not agree more. Rinpoche has helped me in so many ways by teaching me how to apply the teachings I read about in books. He has encouraged me to step out of my comfort zone and take positions of responsibility. Through Rinpoche’s constant encouragement to be real about my practice, I am now taking baby steps towards teaching.

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